AEP6 Report

New Study Reveals Savannah Arts Have Major Economic Impact

 

SAVANNAH (Dec. 29, 2023) – The City of Savannah Cultural Resources Department announced the findings of a major study today that indicates Savannah’s nonprofit arts and cultural industry had a major economic impact last year.

The Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 (AEP6) economic and social impact study conducted by Americans for the Arts, along with the Cultural Resources Department found that Savannah’s nonprofits generated $120,532,394 in economic activity in 2022.

“Within Savannah’s bracket of cities, we see an outsized impact of arts dollars spent here by arts and cultural agencies compared with other cities our size,” Senior Director of the Cultural Resources Department Stuart Miller said. “The report shows that Savannah’s total arts and culture expenditures are three times greater than the median within our population cohort. In regard to spending by audiences at arts and culture events, Savannah ranks five times higher than the median.”

That economic activity included over $35,000,000 in spending by nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and over $85,000,000 in event-related spending by their audiences. That spending supported 1,074 jobs and generated over $4,000,000 in local, state and federal government revenue.

The study found that in Savannah, a typical attendee spends $55.36 per person, per event, not including the cost of admission. Of the attendees, 29.4% were from outside the county and spent an average of $111.98.

“The study provides detail to what we already know about arts and cultural being a powerful economic engine in Savannah,” Miller said. “Our city has a wealth of organizations that make the arts an integral part of life for our residents and draw impressive number of visitors to Savannah. We have one of the most vibrant creative economies in Georgia.”

The AEP6 study, the largest and most inclusive study of its kind, uses a rigorous methodology to document the economic and social contributions of the nation’s nonprofit arts industry. The study asked Savannah arts attendees about how they valued the arts venue they visited and the arts activity they viewed.

In response, 89.9% of respondents agreed that the activity or venue they were attending was a source of neighborhood pride for the community and 86.4% said they would feel a sense of loss if that activity or venue was no longer available.

The full report, including information about how Savannah compares with the other 372 study regions, can be found at AEP6.AmericansForTheArts.org. A two-page summary of the results for the City of Savannah can be found at savannahga.gov/arts.